Eddie Peabody Vox IV Comparison

Eddie Peabody Vox IV Comparison

Photos of Vega’s custom engraving on the Eddie Peabody banjo presented to George Webber in 1969 as compared to standard Vox IV (also shown). Peabody banjo has custom bell brass internal parts by Larry Kellens and a 1920s Tubaphone tone ring added. The heavily engraved flange tension hoop and tailpiece were plated in 24 carat gold and then laquered. It is legend that Larry Kellens’ plater put two ounces of pure gold on these parts for Eddie. When you see the banjo in person it looks like it. The custom built engraved EP armrest made for Webber is in ‘blue chrome’ as were all of Eddie’s. Eddie hand-carried the banjo to Webber on the plane from Tucson to Cleveland for his appearance there. Although the Vega Co. gave Eddie banjos at no cost he confided that he had over $750 worth of custom work done on this one — engraving plating etc including the modified Lifton hard shell case that had Eddie’s custom “extra heavy” handle brackets and large leather handle added. This work had all been done before the sale to Webber. Larry’s new armrest to Webber was then added. To give a sense of all the added custom work bear in mind that a standard VegaVox IV could be bought for around $1000 at that time. See photo of Webber’s check made payable to Eddie Peabody for Larry Kellens’ custom work that Eddie had arranged. FYI: Larry Kellens A.K.A. Dr. Banjo was a legendary banjo adjustment guru for top professionals like Eddie Peabody Don Van Palta Skip Devol and Scotty Plummer back in the in the 50s 60s and 70s. As a retired Marine Warrant Officer and seasoned combat vetern Larry was a close friend of Eddie Peabody’s who for over 30 years did all of Eddie’s banjo repair and adjustment. In fact any banjo that Vega ever made for Eddie was shipped first to Larry in San Diego where he would modified and adjust it to Eddie’s taste. Sometimes Larry would keep a banjo for three months just experimenting before he sent it on to Eddie. As a teenager I spent many an afternoon sitting with Larry in his shop working on banjos — including one of Eddies.

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Photos of Vega’s custom engraving on the Eddie Peabody banjo presented to George Webber in 1969 as compared to standard Vox IV (also shown). Peabody banjo has custom bell brass internal parts by Larry Kellens and a 1920s Tubaphone tone ring added. The heavily engraved flange tension hoop and tailpiece were plated in 24 carat gold and then laquered. It is legend that Larry Kellens’ plater put two ounces of pure gold on these parts for Eddie. When you see the banjo in person it looks like it. The custom built engraved EP armrest made for Webber is in ‘blue chrome’ as were all of Eddie’s. Eddie hand-carried the banjo to Webber on the plane from Tucson to Cleveland for his appearance there. Although the Vega Co. gave Eddie banjos at no cost he confided that he had over $750 worth of custom work done on this one — engraving plating etc including the modified Lifton hard shell case that had Eddie’s custom “extra heavy” handle brackets and large leather handle added. This work had all been done before the sale to Webber. Larry’s new armrest to Webber was then added. To give a sense of all the added custom work bear in mind that a standard VegaVox IV could be bought for around $1000 at that time. See photo of Webber’s check made payable to Eddie Peabody for Larry Kellens’ custom work that Eddie had arranged. FYI: Larry Kellens A.K.A. Dr. Banjo was a legendary banjo adjustment guru for top professionals like Eddie Peabody Don Van Palta Skip Devol and Scotty Plummer back in the in the 50s 60s and 70s. As a retired Marine Warrant Officer and seasoned combat vetern Larry was a close friend of Eddie Peabody’s who for over 30 years did all of Eddie’s banjo repair and adjustment. In fact any banjo that Vega ever made for Eddie was shipped first to Larry in San Diego where he would modified and adjust it to Eddie’s taste. Sometimes Larry would keep a banjo for three months just experimenting before he sent it on to Eddie. As a teenager I spent many an afternoon sitting with Larry in his shop working on banjos — including one of Eddies.